Sign In
Chapter 4
Chapter 4

​​​​​​​​​​​​​Elk Hunting University Chapter 4 is now in session!

Our 2013 fall semester for Elk Hunting University is now underway. I am sure all of you have used the off season to study, research and plan some great experiences in the high country of Colorado for the coming elk season.​

Elk in the trees. By David Hannigan.Our 2013 fall semester for Elk Hunting University is now underway. I am sure all of you have used the off season to study, research and plan some great experiences in the high country of Colorado for the coming elk season.

This is our fourth year of working to provide basic information for the novice elk hunter who is seeking to learn the skills, tactics and techniques necessary to succeed at this most challenging adventure. For those new students who are joining our sessions for the first time, I strongly recommend you read the first three chapters posted on the website so you can become familiar with the content we have previously provided.

This year we look to add some additional lessons about DIY (Do It Yourself) hunting opportunities and look to assist the students with some ideas about how to be successful on self guided adventures. We have gathered some questions from readers in the off season about different parts of the DIY experience and added a few topics the “professors” thought would be of value to all of you. Our topics list includes: Using Pack horses and llamas, glassing techniques, a look at some public land units and some discussion about resources available in the state.

Before we begin the first lesson, let me add a bit of background to the concept of EHU to refresh the “students” memories. We began classes in 2010 as an effort to provide the novice hunter with a place to begin to learn about elk hunting. Recall our “professors” are not literary experts, rather seasoned hunters who wish to pass along their ideas, opinions and experiences to the novice hunter. Some of the information presented in the chapter lessons comes from the personal opinion and experience of the authors. They are not professional outdoors authors with years of editorial experience so the articles may not look like those presented in many outdoor magazines. I have asked them to refrain from “telling hunting stories” and focus on information the reader can put to good use in planning their own adventures.

With the above in mind, let’s begin the semester. Good luck in class and your "tests" in the field this fall.​​

- Jim Bulger, Hunter Outreach Coordinator