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CPW News Release
CPW News Release
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3/11/2019
Moose falls into window well of Keystone home, 800-pound animal rescued and released uninjured after nearly 6-hour ordeal


Moose falls into window well of Keystone home, 800-pound animal rescued and released uninjured after nearly 6-hour ordeal
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
"Only the moose's shoulders, head and antlers were visible," said CPW District Wildlife Manager Tom Davies of Summit County. "We are lucky the moose did not fall through the window into the home or we would be talking about a dead, or severely injured moose, not to mention thousands of dollars in property damage."
Mike Porras
CPW NW Region PIO
970-255-6162
Moose falls into window well of Keystone home, 800-pound animal rescued and released uninjured after nearly 6-hour ordeal

KEYSTONE, Colo. - Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Summit County Fire and EMS and over a dozen employees from nearby Keystone Ski Resort responded to help rescue a bull moose that fell into a window well of a local home, becoming stuck for almost 6 hours late Saturday.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers say the moose was 'being a moose,' wandering in the darkness in the residential area Saturday evening when it accidentally stumbled into the 5-foot-deep window well. According to the officers, the moose had been walking adjacent to the home where the snow was less deep before tumbling into the opening next to the home.

"Only the moose's shoulders, head and antlers were visible," said CPW District Wildlife Manager Tom Davies of Summit County. "We are lucky the moose did not fall through the window into the home or we would be talking about a dead, or severely injured moose, not to mention thousands of dollars in property damage."

Davies and two of his fellow CPW officers, Gene Abram and Rachel Sralla, tranquilized the moose before personnel with Summit County Fire used a makeshift contraption comprised of a ladder and a pulley system attached to a nearby tree to lift the approximately 800 lb. bull out of its predicament. Rescuers finally extricated the animal at approximately 2 a.m.

"One thing the public should know - tranquilizing a moose is nowhere near as simple as it sounds," said Davies. "Due to the severe stress the animal endured, we are all very thankful it survived the tranquilization and the ordeal."

Davies thanked everyone that responded to assist in the rescue.

"Summit County Fire's assistance proved invaluable," said Davies. "Their help, the two other CPW officers that helped me, and the fact that a significant number of employees from Keystone responded and were available as needed shows that the operation was truly a group effort. It would have been nearly impossible to get that moose out alive without causing significant damage if not for the help of the various groups that responded."

For more information about moose in Colorado, visit the CPW website.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.
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